Monday, June 16, 2014

No Sheeple Here

Where does a "prepper" end and self sufficiency begin?
When one realizes that prepping is all well and good, but unless you have the incredible fortune to have 5 years worth of supplies squirreled away, you're going to have to learn how to be self sufficient.
In fact, many advocates of self-sufficiency started  on the path to prepping.

When I say "prepping", I'm not talking about tinfoil-hat-wearing-rifle-toting-live-underground types.
Generally, I'm talking about the folks who put food and basic supplies aside in times of just-in-case.
Just-in-case could be shortage of work, extended power outages, store shortages, road closures, natural disasters, and the list goes on depending on geography, financial climate, etc.


Digital Journal explains it like this;
"The heart of the prepper message: No power, no stores open. No stores open, no food. During the Los Angeles riots, truckers refused to deliver to supermarkets because it was too dangerous. People living day-to-day who have consumed the limited amount of food they have begin to get desperate, and, in the case of a massive or multiple disasters, government assistance may or may not be forthcoming. Indeed, the government itself may be the problem."

It's an easy stroll from a "prepper" mindset to one of self sufficiency.
For example, one day I can be thinking about buying freeze-dried fruit online and three days later I'm planting my own strawberry beds so that I won't have to buy strawberries online next year. The money I save not buying the fruit online can be diverted into a dehydrator.
See? No message of doom and gloom, but rather, think ahead.

It's an engaging, a creative use of the grey-matter between our ears. One that takes responsibility for ourselves. One that says we can think for ourselves, no sheeple here, thank you very much.


Read more: http://www.digitaljournal.com/news/world/doomsday-prepping-comes-of-age-reaches-cities-affluent/article/384096#ixzz34og7c5uA

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Rough Beauty



There is a kind of rough beauty out here. The kind that can kill you, or cure you, depending on how you step, how you breathe and how your heart beats.
One step can either break a leg or take your breath away with rapture.
That's how it is out here.
The trees can whisper wisdom to you if you only stop and listen.
Of course you must stop yourself first.
Stop the mind-chatter, the ego, the judging, the "tapes" that lecture on your inadequacies....stop it all and just listen.

To the wind, the water, to the birds and to the voice of the Divine in everything around you.

If you can do that, you will leave this place a different person.

A better, less-fractured, universe-touched person.

Friday, April 04, 2014

Elliott Brood - Write it All Down For You





This is what has my toes tapping on our grey rainy morning. This is the best version of this song. I didn't care much for the live versions.

Enjoy!

Thursday, January 09, 2014

Cold Weather Planning In Your Vehicle

For most of us in Northern Ontario this winter, these past few months have been crazy. It has been snowing, cold, windy, sometimes freezing rain and occasionally sunny. While we have been lucky enough to not have any freezing rain up here, I know folks who have. As I said, the weather here in Ontario is crazy this winter.
Because of all this, the boys have had a lot of snow days lately. In the midst of a conversation about traveling conditions for a school bus, it occurred to one of my parents that the van had no emergency kit should anything happen  during one of the trips to and/or from town. We live an hour away from town, by vehicle, and -30 is not the time to be stranded along a road! So it has been decided that the van needs some kind of emergency kit.

Top of the list, for winter, is a wool blanket or two, which can be easily found at a thrift shop. Barring wool, a fleece blanket will serve, but wool is the fiber of choice up here! Candles and a way to light them are of equal importance. A couple of small tea candles could keep the interior of a vehicle above freezing. Not as comfortable as home, but enough to keep us alive. Of equal importance, water. Bottles of water would need to be circulated and obviously NOT kept outside. There's no point in having 6 water bottles in the back of the van if they've all frozen and split, only to soak everything when the ice inside thaws. To my mind, this would require a small backpack that would need to be taken out and brought in before and after every trip. Yes, it takes a little more effort, but you can survive for weeks on only water. Not true with food.
Because one of the parents is diabetic, we will need some kind of food in the kit to keep those blood sugar levels up.

I'm thinking too that one of those signs that go in the windshield "Call Police" might be a good idea too. Especially since we, and by extension our cell phone, don't always travel with the folks.

Of course this is not a proper or complete list by any means...merely a jumping off point.

What about you? Do you have an emergency kit? Do you need to build one? What would go into, or is already, in yours?

Sunday, November 17, 2013

Books Should Go...


Books should go where they will be most appreciated, and not sit unread, gathering dust on a forgotten shelf, don't you agree? 


November 17, 1983: Happy 30th birthday, Christopher Paolini! The young science fiction author was home schooled and managed to graduate high school at 15, after which he published his first best seller, Eragon.

Tuesday, November 05, 2013

To Make A Farm



Indie films are an interesting breed unto themselves, but I find them most fascinating when they examine a topic very few others have looked at. In this age of mass-produced entertainment, films that make us think are gems indeed. I'm excited to share this with you, an indie film that follows five farmers on three Canadian farms as they try to make a profit. Farming is difficult enough these days with all kinds of challenges, but up here in Canada it is even more so. Not many people in these modern times are connected to their food, although that number is growing, and even fewer understand the person that lives a way of life that was largely abandoned for decades. So I invite you to follow the link to a fascinating article. Make the effort to find the film and watch with an open mind.
It's worth it.
Best of all, you might just come away with a better understanding of those that are doing what they can to reconnect with their food and the land.
You can find the interview at Scratch magazine.

Sunday, November 03, 2013

Empty Lots, Grand Visions



So what's more important? 75 units of housing for people that are going to make more than $150,000 a year, or a park that will benefit AIDS sufferers, the elderly that may never see wild spaces again and youngsters.
It's a conundrum. Housing, or a green space that helps people in ways difficult to quantify? The units won't even serve as many middle income families as the city needs because the rules for affordable housing there are far removed from what folks need.
The complete story can be found here